February 2018 WAVES Newsletter
Spotlight on the Good Works of the RCM Community Trust: Rotary Day at The United Nations

“Peace needs to be lived rather than preached” (Ed Futa)

 

President JoAnne and Mary joined more than 1,200 Rotarians who gathered in Geneva, Switzerland, for Rotary Day at the United Nations.

 

President JoAnne and Executive Director Mary McCormick.

 

Representing 87 countries, they convened on Saturday, 11 November, at the Palais des Nations,  and dedicated themselves to the theme introduced by Rotary President Ian H. S. Riseley: “Peace: Making a Difference.”

 

The advancement of international understanding, goodwill, and peace have always been among Rotary’s primary goals,” said Riseley. “It is past time for all of us to recognize the potential of all of our Rotary service to build peace, and approach that service with peacebuilding in mind.”

 

He also noted:  “The work of polio eradication, has taught us . . . that when you have enough people working together, when you understand the problems and the processes, when you combine and leverage your resources, when you set a plan and set your targets — you can indeed move mountains,” he said. “And the need for action, and cooperation, is greater now than ever before.”

 

Rotary Day concluded Geneva Peace Week, during which John Hewko, general secretary of Rotary International, noted the “close and longstanding ties between Rotary and the UN in (their) mutual pursuit of peace and international understanding.”

 

Rotary members “can transform a concept like peace to a reality through service,” said Ed Futa, dean of the Rotary Representatives to the United Nations.

 

“Peace needs to be lived rather than preached.”

 

During a Rotary Day highlight, Hewko introduced Rotary’s 2017 People of Action: Champions of Peace. He praised them as “an embodiment of the range and impact of our organization’s work,” and saluted them for providing “a roadmap for what more peaceful, resilient societies look like.”

 

Below you will find brief profiles of two honorees:

 

Alejandro Reyes Lozano, of the Rotary Club of Bogotá Capital, Cundinamarca, Colombia: As “part of the generation that grew up with uncertainty and fear,” as he put it, Reyes Lozano played a key role in negotiating an end to the 50-year conflict between the Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Now he’s using a Rotary Foundation global grant to lead peacebuilding efforts among women from six Latin American countries.

 

Safina Rahman, of the Rotary Club of Dhaka Mahanagar, Bangladesh: “Education is a powerful and transformative vehicle for peace,” said Rahman, a passionate advocate for workers’ rights and workplace safety who also promotes and provides educational and vocational opportunities for girls.

 

Many thanks to the A.D. Robertson Fund for the United Nations for supporting our club’s participation in the Geneva Conference.